Yet again another Korean beauty product has hit the masses and picked up momentum.

Ladies everywhere are using charcoal toothpaste to whiten their teeth quickly and naturally, and documenting their results on social media platforms like YouTube.

The trend has officially gone viral, and users claim to see drastic results in just 3 to 5 minutes, and in as little as one application.

But are the results of this new beauty trend really that incredible, and more importantly is it even safe to use charcoal toothpaste to whiten teeth at home?

According to the American Dental Association the use of charcoal to whiten teeth has not been studied, and many dentists warn against using a product that is not ADA approved, according to Fox News.

The main concern noted by dentists is the possible tooth erosion and dental deterioration caused by prolonged use of charcoal on the teeth.

Because charcoal is used to absorb toxins, the idea that it will absorb stains on the teeth makes sense, but how abrasive the charcoal is when used to brush is unknown.

Teeth do not replenish, like hair or nails, and are porous. Because of their makeup using products not ADA approved could cause severe long-term effects.

Products like charcoal toothpaste in a dust and paste form have been sweeping across the Internet, and some users have even suggested buying pure charcoal tablets, cutting them open, and mixing the charcoal with water to create a DIY version of the toothpaste.

All forms of charcoal toothpaste have yet to be approved due to a lack of study on the products and their long-term effects on teeth and enamel.

The most popular brand of charcoal toothpaste is by a line called Bamboo Charcoal, and is advertised as 100 percent pure organic and safe to use.

However, dentists recommend anyone looking for a whiter smile should consult their dentist and use a safe and ADA approved method only.